Developing a Plan for Healthy Eating


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Setting goals

Set goals you want to achieve. It is generally best to set small, measurable goals. You can set them on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. When setting goals, consider:

  • Where you want to start. This could be with meals or food. For example, begin by working on a healthy breakfast, and move to other meals after this goal has been reached. Or, decide to eat more fruits and worry about other foods later.
  • Making one change at a time. Rather than changing your diet overnight, make your changes one at a time. For example, try to eat at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day, cut back on eating out to once a week, or eat seafood in place of meat or chicken twice a week.
  • Choosing more of the healthy foods that you enjoy. Make a list of the foods you like and see how you can change them to make them healthier. For example, make pizza at home using low-fat mozzarella cheese and lots of fresh vegetables. Substitute healthy foods you like for less nutritious ones in your diet.
  • Writing down your goals. This provides clear direction on what you want to achieve. Also, reading your goals can serve as a helpful reminder.
    • Click here for a My Personal Action Plan
    • Click here for a New Year Goals Mind Map
  • Not setting goals that involve rapid weight loss. Rapid weight loss is unhealthy and is hard to maintain.

Track your progress

One way to evaluate your progress is to start recording what you eat in a food journal. People who keep track regularly may be more successful at losing weight and keeping it off.

To help you track your progress:

  • Record the healthy things you do in a notebook or journal. Look over this when you begin to doubt yourself or your abilities.
  • Pay attention to how you feel. Can you notice any difference when you are eating better? Or do you notice any difference when you sometimes eat poorly?
  • Notice whether your food preferences change. As we change what we eat, we learn to like new foods. You may find you don’t like some of the foods you used to eat before you started making changes in your diet. And you may have learned to like new foods that you thought you didn’t like.
  • Look over any lab tests you might have if you are following a special diet. You might notice improvements.
    • Blood sugar tests will tell you whether your diet is helping to control your diabetes.
    • Periodic blood tests can measure your cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
    • You or your health professional can measure your blood pressure to see whether dietary changes are improving it.
  • Click here if you are a Blue Cross Blue Shield member to take the My BluePrint Health Assessment.
    • Once you answer the online questionnaire, you’ll gain:
      • A better understanding of your health right now, including a wellness score.
      • Information on habits that might be putting your health at risk.
      • Advice on steps you can take to chart your journey toward better health.
  • Click here if you aren’t a Blue Cross Blue Shield member to take the American Behavioral’s  general health risk assessment.
    • Once you complete the online questionnaire, you will be provided with health risks and key habits that you can use to help make changes to live a healthier life.
    • To log in, click Register
      • Create a username and password
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